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  1. Introduction
    5Sections
  2. PART 1 -- HEAD/NECK/TORSO RELATIONSHIP
    13Sections
  3. PART 2 - ARMS/TORSO RELATIONSHIP
    12Sections
  4. PART 3 - TORSO/LEGS RELATIONSHIP
    12Sections
  5. PART 4 - HIP JOINTS/KNEES/ANKLES RELATIONSHIP
    10Sections
  6. PART 5 - BODY RELATIONSHIP TO FEET
    10Sections
  7. Conclusion
    3Sections
Part 4, Section 10
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WALKING & the Torso/Legs Relationship

Cécile Raynor November 23, 2021
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When you walk with your head on top of your spine, your chest and upper back open and relaxed, and your arms hanging from your armpits so they can have a natural swing, your legs can easily move from your hip joint sockets.

When you are connected with your skeletal height and width with relaxed muscles, there is space in your joints and it feels like your legs are hanging down to the grown from your hip joint sockets. It feels like your knees and ankles are loosey-goosey and your leg movements unfold with unusual but natural ease. 

TIPS TO EXPERIENCE BEING LIGHT ON YOUR LEGS

To be light on your legs is a sign that your upper body and your lower body are working together in a dynamic relationship.

The next part of this course will help you experience the lightness in your leg more specifically because the focus will be on the joints of your lower body and how to let them be free of tension when you move.

This being said, here are some tips to connect with your skeletal height and tips to keep it going as you walk so your upper body and lower body can work together better while you walk.

  • First, do your shoulder bone rotation one side after the other to respect your state of expansion.
  • Empty your lungs slowly through your mouth, then keep your lips closed while fresh air is filling your lungs up by going up your nose.
  • Notice that this way of breathing in, makes your whole torso expand as a dry sponge dipped in water. Your belly, chest, and back all softly go into a state of expansion.
  • When you let the air come out again through your mouth, make sure that you are not losing your skeletal expansion.
  • Then, softly go on the ball of your feet to go upward.
  • Finally, when you allow yourself to bring your heels back down to the ground, imagine you are still connected to your skeletal height.
  • Lastly, start walking using peripheral vision to keep yourself centered while light on your feet.

Staying connected to your skeletal height and width while embracing peripheral vision to stay connected with your environment is an efficient way to keep space in your joints and ease in your walk!

WALKING WHILE PUSHING SOMETHING ON WHEELS LIKE A SHOPPING CART OR A STROLLER
When you are in the habit of overdoing unknowingly, you will exert unnecessary tension unnecessarily whatever you are doing. Below are two pictures of a mom pushing a stroller. What do you notice at first glance? Which do you identify with most?





In the picture above, the mother is pushing the stroller tensing her arms and shoulders. She is standing away from the stroller and leaning forward to feel stronger in her effort. She is doing just that muscularly “efforting” when it is not necessary.



In the second picture, she is more relaxed, more poised, and she is using her connection to the ground through her skeletal structure and let them do most of the work.

Experience this for yourself!
Next time you are pushing something on wheels, perhaps in a store doing your shopping, start pushing the cart your regular way. Notice how you control the cart when you have a bit of weight in it.

Then, let it go. Stand for a second to find your center by choosing not to tense anywhere. With relaxed arms, bring your relaxed hands to the front handlebar and gently let them rest there. Without grasping, start walking.

Most likely, your habitual way is to control the cart with muscular effort, the heavier the cart, the more muscle you use. You can see how in the pictures below, although they are not doing consciously, the girls are grasping at the cart handlebar which indicates too much muscle engaging. 









With the new way presented here, your skeleton connects to the handlebar. The cart becomes an extension of your body. So, when you start walking, your cart moves forward without any effort on your muscles part. In fact, your hands can remain mostly open because you are letting the bones in the ball of your palm connect with the bar, and nothing else is required when going straight forward.

This is a fun experience of how your legs are connected to your upper body and to anything else your arms carry or move. The more you function as an integrated whole, the easier any movement becomes.

To access your reading recap for Part 3, click the button below!