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Discover Solo Course

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  1. Introduction
    5Sections
  2. PART 1 -- HEAD/NECK/TORSO RELATIONSHIP
    13Sections
  3. PART 2 - ARMS/TORSO RELATIONSHIP
    12Sections
  4. PART 3 - TORSO/LEGS RELATIONSHIP
    12Sections
  5. PART 4 - HIP JOINTS/KNEES/ANKLES RELATIONSHIP
    10Sections
  6. PART 5 - BODY RELATIONSHIP TO FEET
    10Sections
  7. Conclusion
    3Sections
Part 3, Section 11
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===== READING RECAP =====

Cécile Raynor November 23, 2021
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Arms are extensions of the back. They are meant to move from your armpits, not from your shoulder blades.

Moving from your shoulder blades when upright tends to make you round your shoulders forward and down into a slouch.

Slouching makes you sit on the back end of your sitting bones which is not comfortable for very long and fuels the cycle of arching up to “sit up straight” then slouching, back and forth which tires your back enormously. 

Arms are involved in all your daily activities. They allow you to reach into the world around you to pick up things, to give something, or to do something like typing on a keyboard, eating, writing, or playing an instrument. You often need both of them to lift an inanimate object or a child. When misused all day long, you find your shoulder blades, shoulders, or neck compromised and then complaining until it becomes a chronic condition.

Moreover, how you use or misuse your shoulders contribute to what is happening in your hands and wrists. There are nerves going through the front of your shoulder bones that connects with your hands and fingers. When that area is squished because of rounded shoulders, it interferes with the best functioning of these nerves all the way through your wrists and hands.

That is why moving from your natural hinges allows your shoulder bones to remain where they belong, and avoiding to use muscles to do the job of your joints is the best way to avoid muscular discomfort or pain.

To recap key points in Part 1 & 2:

  1.  Initiating your head movement from your occipital joint or higher can literally save your neck from building excess tension. 
  2. Initiating your arm movement from your armpits can literally save your shoulder blades, shoulders, and neck from building excess tension. It also supports the best functioning of your wrists and hands while promoting your good posture.

To complete Part 2, access the “Living It” section by clicking the right button below.