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  1. Introduction
    5Sections
  2. PART 1 -- HEAD/NECK/TORSO RELATIONSHIP
    13Sections
  3. PART 2 - ARMS/TORSO RELATIONSHIP
    12Sections
  4. PART 3 - TORSO/LEGS RELATIONSHIP
    12Sections
  5. PART 4 - HIP JOINTS/KNEES/ANKLES RELATIONSHIP
    10Sections
  6. PART 5 - BODY RELATIONSHIP TO FEET
    10Sections
  7. Conclusion
    3Sections
Part 2, Section 10
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ELECTRONICS & the Head/Neck/Torso Relationship

Cécile Raynor November 23, 2021
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Let’s see how you handle sitting at your computer. Are you contributing to your head, neck, and torso aches and pains?  Well, let’s see what you can do to decrease or eliminate your excess tension or pain level!



  Jeremy @ his computer
When sitting at your computer, you may be slouching in your chair. Little by little, out of habit, it feels more and more comfortable, and yet, it makes your neck and shoulders complain periodically or chronically.

As mentioned earlier, it is not a question of straightening your back with your muscles. That is not sustainable and a few seconds later, you go straight back to slouching. Right?

For now, let’s see how the instructions you were given with driving work just as well when at your computer:

  • Lean quite a bit forward while you move your rear end as close as possible to the back of your chair so that the top of your head and your tailbone are pointing in the opposite direction. 
  • Tilting at your sitting bones, let your torso come back above right above them. When in the right place, you are not slouched, nor do you feel the urge to push yourself up and hold in place. Your supported coccyx allows your spine to lengthen upward organically.

As a result, your sitting bones are pointing away from the top of your head and your head can be supported by the seat you are sitting on, all the way through your skeletal structure. Relying on your bones, you can relax any excess tension and let your necessary muscles and bones work together to support you efficiently. Necessary muscles are barely perceptible, they do not need to make efforts to do their task.
As in the example of the car, you may need to add a foam wedge to bridge the gap between your upper back and the back of your chair. You do not want to lean back onto the wedge, however. You mainly use it so you can stay upright with more ease. Your coccyx is supported by the bottom of your seat and the wedge keeps the bone in the right place so the muscles can release straight down into your support.

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