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  1. Introduction
    5Sections
  2. PART 1 -- HEAD/NECK/TORSO RELATIONSHIP
    13Sections
  3. PART 2 - ARMS/TORSO RELATIONSHIP
    12Sections
  4. PART 3 - TORSO/LEGS RELATIONSHIP
    12Sections
  5. PART 4 - HIP JOINTS/KNEES/ANKLES RELATIONSHIP
    10Sections
  6. PART 5 - BODY RELATIONSHIP TO FEET
    10Sections
  7. Conclusion
    3Sections
Part 5, Section 6
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DRIVING & Hip Joints/Knees/Ankle Relationship

Cécile Raynor November 23, 2021
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When you are driving, do any of the joints in this relationship get triggered or tired after a while?

If yes, it is a sign that you are most likely not using your skeletal structure sufficiently. How can you do this?

Well, when you are driving, you have one leg extended to reach the pedals and one less active leg. 

The foot of the extended leg can rest on the ground so that you can rock your foot on your heel bone as needed. This way, your ankle joint does not overwork and it can remain relaxed. If you are on the short side, you can add one or more layers of car carpeting to help you reach the pedal while resting your foot where your heel bone touches the floor.




Like in the picture above, the other leg can move periodically if you are driving for long periods of time so neither your joints or muscles get stiff. However, it is better for the sole of your foot to be flat on the floor of your car. This way, your whole skeletal structure has some support that would come in handy if you were to stop abruptly or make a sharp turn. It is also helpful when you need to look to one side or the other when looking quite a bit behind you and to the side. The more you use your skeletal structure, the less you are likely to tense your hip joint or knee as you would when you control your movements by tensing your muscles to move your bones.





When your more passive leg is extended like in the picture above, it makes it easier to lean on the back of your car seat and progressively start to lose the full support under your sitting bones. It’s alright to do it if you need to stretch your leg, better do not make it a permanent way to sit. Also, when you go back to bringing your foot flat, lean forward from your sitting bones, and scoot your buttocks back. You can use your hands on the wheel and your foot on the floor to help you readjust your sitting. Only, focus on using your skeletal structure rather than grasping with your muscles to manoeuver.

What you need to experience is that there is a supportive connection between the sitting bones and your feet. You could say that your sitting bones are the feet of your torso. When you use either one efficiently, it supports the other one to also function efficiently.

HOW DOES THIS WORK EXACTLY?

As mentioned earlier with your hands on the wheel, the more you are balanced above your sitting bones and relaxing your muscles, the more your skeletal structure can do what it is designed to do: give you whole body strength without the need to tense your arms or hands muscles which would create unnecessary muscle tension.

It can do that because it is designed to function as an integrated whole. When you gently push against the wheel with the bones of your hands, you feel your back connecting to your seat, and soon after if you keep it up, you connect with your flat foot on the floor. When you push against the wheel with muscle engagement…..

For instance, as long as the knee in your less active leg is bent and your foot flat on the floor, when you gently push against the floor of your car with that foot, you will notice how you get taller above your sitting bones